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: the chicago board of education is expected to vote on the measure in may. declining enrollment has also forced other major cities like washington d.c. and philadelphia to close scores of public schools in recent years. we take up the debate now with two people at the center of the fight. we start with jesse ruiz. he's vice president of the chicago board of education. he was appointed to that post by mayor rahm emanuel in 2011. i spoke with him a short time ago. welcome to you, so why is such a dramatic action so necessary? is this resources, money, pure and simple? >> no. it is two-fold. one, we are looking at a record budget deficit of about $1 billion next year. so we're looking for every aspect to reap savings in our system. and we have underutilized schools as a result from it population loss in certain parts of the city of chicago. it's healthy for those schools to right size, to become fully utilizeed schools and combining under-utilizeed schools which garners savings we can reinvest and focus the resources we have in one school billion as opposed to multiple, partially used billions. >>
's not without the controversy, but the budget cuts that are from educators to parents about the morality of corporate advertising in schools is certainly causing a stir. yet, filling the financial shortfall is the biggest prem fa prem-- problem facing schools today. and he needs funding. >> american public education is in financial crisis. >> he heads up education funding partners, a colorado firm that matches it with schools looking for cash. >> they want the right partners and the right controls, our model gives them that control. >> over the years more schools have been turning to corporate sponsors for much needed revenue. they struck a deal with staples in exchange for ads on the district's website and a supply list containing a coupon and kids got to attend the science enrichment program. >> it's really about selling anything, it's about allowing companies to come in and partner for a good cause and public education in responsible ways. >> there are aggressive campaigns out there buses and playing fields becoming common. for some districts it's what keep the doors open. critics arg
voices to help educate people. we have so many screaming people on both sides of the equation, and we're not making enough progress. >> dr. carson, i watched you, and we've been on the show before, for which i am grateful, and i've watched you on other shows and have been reading about you. it looks like you are a problem solver and looking for common ground. i get that. that's probably something lacking in this country. i just had a thought on the economy. if you take a look at unemployment rates, overall, 7.7% is not the worst thing in the world, but four years after the recovery, it should be lower. here's the ones that are killers, and i just want to get your thoughts on how to solve it. teenage employment in the usa, total teenage employment, 25%. overall black employment, 13.8%. and the worst one is teenage black employment, 43%. how in the world can we solve those problems, sir? >> it's going to take a concerted effort. first of all, we as a society need to recognize for every one of those young people we can keep from going on the path of despair, that's one more tax paying pr
an index fund. they have to educate for themselves. >> that's an interesting point. most people would think the opposite. putting my money in a bank is not risky. an index fund is risky. comes down to people's fear. worried about the market. the market is volatile and it's risky. what do you do when people tell you that? >> it's the thing about fear and ignorance allowing us to dictate financial decisions. we should never allow that. we should never be scared of something you don't know about. a lot of individuals are scared of something because they have not put pun in the market. what other alternatives do you have? show me another that can give you a 13.2% return. you show me another that can give that type of return or security. what we have to do, this is what lewis has been doing for years, directly addressing and making sure you know there are other alternatives such as exchange traded funds. for $150 a share you can buy the entire s&p 500. >> all you need is a trading account to get in. this gives you exposure. >> again, you don't trust because it's high risk. there's ways to mitiga
on yields. investors are racing to the safe haven of things. almost any conversation about education ends up coming down to money. money is the reason behind the latest and largest school closures in our nations history. chicago is closing 54 schools. can you imagine? it's an effort to shore up the billion dollar budget deficit. as shocking as this sounds, cities are facing similar meesures are in your city could be one of them. could this actually be the best medicine? joining me n is the ceo of the illinois policy institute. >> and the 2010 census, 200,000 africans left and that has been a decades long time. many are declaring that the chicago public school system, which has monopoly control over educational systems is failing. they are leaving. we have these empty scols that have to be closed. melissa: it seems a liitle too easy. some people have been saying that the schools are empty, they are curable schools, is they're not going to be overcrowding? >> chicago's population is in a long-term decline. we have the lowest population that we have had since 1920. it was built from hundreds of
that the economic philosophy of republicans has caused a massive amount of wealth for everyone. and education is ripe if reform and republican principles are perfect for minority voters. >> should i let you weigh in? >> i'm sorry. >> why are you laughing? >> you're laughing at education. expound upon your laughter on education. >> well, because its s's ridicus to try to think that the party who tried to get rid of the department of education is the one who wants to push education. it's ridiculous to think the tent that wanted to gut the teachers union want to push education. the party that wanted to take funding away from education is now the party in favor of education. that's reason i started laughing. >> those policieses worked well for you over the last 40 years. those schools that you're professing that teachers unions have a hold on on are doing really well. where school choice and charter schools that's what's doing well and voters across minority voters to voters of every ethnicity tick have seen the benefits of those kind of schools. >> by this argument, we can see how difficult the
campaigning for girls rights to an education. taliban extremists shot her in the head. since then, she has been receiving treatment in birmingham. >> at 15, she has already seized responsibility, taking her fight for education to the world stage. there's even talk of a nobel peace prize. concerns today, her are those of every other british teenager. it is all about making friends. she is doing her best. >> she herself wants to be a normal teenage girl and to have the support of other girls around her. i think that is something she has very much missed during her time in hospital. >> she will enter in your 9 -- year 9. >> today, tens of thousands of people filled st. peter's square for the first public mass of pope francis. the newly installed pontiff said out his priorities and thrilled the crowd, riding around in an open vehicle. our correspondent has the story. >> he wants his pontificate to be marked by humility, to be a pope close to the people, so gone are the bullet through screens that would separate him from the masses. he mary's the authority of the papacy with the informal sponta
to the senate floor. gregg? >> growing concerns over higher education in the united states as new numbers suggest the level of student loan debt is reaching crisis proportions. according to the federal reserve bank of new york, americans now hold a total of nearly a trillion dollars in student loan debt, as an average of $23,000 per person and that could take an advantage person roughly tn years to pay off, maybe more. joining us now the reverend jesse jackson, founder and president of the rainbow push coalition. i know you're deeply concerned about this, in part because i read your recent column on the problem. how do we solve it. >> well, it's more about a trillion dollars, more than credit card debt, so many youth who have able minds will not apply and those in school cannot stay in. and in black colleges about 15,000 fewer this year and some, the money without necessarily the grade. and some grades can't because of the money and that undermines our future capacity to compete. >> gregg: part of the problem is that the price of a four-year college education has really skyrocketed. i loo
of education creating and filling a new job and pays six figures. and washington correspondent byron york joins us and the reason is, this is probably after the sequestration. >> it is, it's the white house initiative on educational excellence for african-americans, it was created by executive order. >> greta: the president did it. >> he created it himself, by the president last year. it was placed in the education department, pay is about $124,000 a year and it's just been filled. >> greta: after march 1st? >> after march 1st and sequestration takes effect. what you have when you have the czars or coordinators or whatever you want to call them, it's an admission that the federal government has a lot of programs that are spending a lot of money that aren't well-coordinated and aren't working together well and the president feels he needs to appoint somebody to do that. right there it's kind of an admission the whole system is a little bloated. >> greta: after everything else is cut march 1st and when he created by executive order we knew sequestration was likely to happen within six or seven mo
the seventh fittest economy in the world. we're ranked 34th in primary education and health care. our macro economic environment is 111th. that cannot be right. our next guest says the notion that we're losing our competitive edge is widespread and pervasive, it is not necessarily correct. ed mcbride is the washington bureau chief for the author of the special ro on america competitiveness. welcome, sir. >> thank you for having me. >> would you like to tell me, and i welcome the message that things are not as bleak as we've been told. please. talk us off the ledge. >> well, as you said, there is a the love hand wringing, a lot of reports. these dire statistic that's seem so dreadful. it is almost impossible to remember they're true. 111th? that's to do with the size of the national debt basically. but what all these gloomy sort of hand wringing accounts neglect, they focus on washington and on gridlock and on the failure to resolve all the questions about the budget and they don't look at what's going on in the rest of the country. the good news is, that in the rest country, people aren't s
will get jobs because of your education but many will pay $200,000 and get little more than that. this is why dale stephens dropped out and has the web site uncollege.org and his book hack education. what do you mean? there is a reason people go to college. >> that is what society says you need to do but that means you have to learn what they tell you the not what you want to interest you. john: i just want comic books and girls i wouldn't have learned anything. >> maybe you start a comic book about girls. [laughter] >> you tell me your doing better? >> there is a community around the world who is actively doing creative things with their education one dropped out now is an artist and getting commissions. summer building solar powered computers but without paying the high cost of college. i did not go to middle school or high school. john: your parents let you leave school? >> they were not fans of the idea but i thought if i leave for one year what is the big loss? if i go back school will be there. john: you even took college courses? you could just not pay? >> professors were
the crac, has not been educate along the way. i think an organization like the national endowment for financial education is a great resource to start from. i don't believe that wall street is always the best place to get educated. so there's a start, a place to start a plan. melissa: yeah. >> next thing have someone hold you accountable. meet with somebody. i like pat's idea, find a financial buddy. we often work out with a buddy to help us out. find a financial advisor and somebody you can work with. melissa: that makes sense. you say saving 15 to 20% of your annual income. i wonder at what price? saving aside 20% of the your income, does that mean you don't buy a house, you rent instead? would you set aside the income and use credit cards and rack up debt so you can save? at what price, how seriouous is it to save that much money. >> how serious is that individual, that's the question. because let's put this in reference. this individual that in our scenario, sob who is 50 to 60 years old or so, they're really at the peak of their financial succs. they're making the most they e
in the workplace. your reaction? > > my reaction is that these are very privileged women, highly educated, with many opportunities. i do not believe that they are an expression of women today. most people say, in terms of marissa mayer, that, if you want productivity, you let people work from home because they have more time, more energy and more flexibility; and if you want innovation, then you bring them all together. and i think a combination of those two things is the best way to support an institution, a culture, and a business. on the other hand, i am very concerned about it. i think the issue is that women are empowered. we do not- > sandberg you are talking about? > > yes. we do not get our power from men, we do not get our power from others, we do not have to accommodate or manipulate to become empowered. we do have the education, we have the experience, we have the knowledge, and we are empowered. so i believe that i am in opposition to the position of both of those two women. > let me ask you about sexism. there is blatant sexism in countries such as india or afghanistan- > > a
. >> the teachers do not teach in class. cannot pay,children so they don't learn in class. the education is like wasted time. >> this person does not work for any international organization. he is one of the many individuals who provide services to local communities. he made the decision 12 years ago. he thought he had a well-paid job in the oil industry. when he became infected with hiv and his wife died of aids, his life was turned upside down. today, the children are getting a special lesson. two women from switzerland are staying in the guest house. they have agreed to spend time with the children. and -- them is a primary school teacher. it is a chance for the youngsters to learn some english. >> i like blue. >> the school has benefited from the political changes in myanmar. until recently, they have only offer the occasional weekend class. private schools were outlawed under the military regime, but that ban has been overturned. now they want to open a proper school at a regular timetable. the building is well under way. forill have enough space 300 pupils. he is impatient about getting bu
of phoenix and other for-profit educational institutions, reported a 79% drop due to lower enrollment. the stock was the biggest gainer in the s&p today, up more than 7%. coming up, we'll look at why some college graduates are having trouble with education debt and what some schools are doing about it. >> and alsoñuf still ahead, the supreme court hears a case that touches the wallet and the medicine cabinets of moat americans. first take a look at how the international markets finished the day. >>> some good news about prices at the pump. average gasoline prices fell a little more than 3 cents a gallon to $3.71 nationwide. the city with the highest average price in the lower 48 states? see if you can guess. chicago, $4.10. lowest average price just $3.33 a gallon is in montana. >> just days after the senate passed its first budget in four years, bill dudley, president of the federal reserve bank in new york, told -- >> this may not immediately lead to stronger growth because of the recent increase in fiscal restraint. >> also washington today, the supreme court hearing arguments in
confident that an investment in their education will lead them to good-paying jobs when they graduate. a balanced budget gives them that confidence that their future will not be threatened by staggering debt. most important we must balance our budget for our children and grandchildren who deserve the same chance of the american dream that we have been given. rather than handing them a bill for this generation's irresponsibility, a balanced budget will allow us to hand them a brighter future, an american future. our budget, a balanced budget, represents a departure from the status quo here in washington and it represents house republicans' commitment to moving our nation forward in a fiscally responsible way. i urge my colleagues to support this resolution and i yield back my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the chair recognizes the gentleman from maryland, mr. sarbanes, for five minutes. mr. sarbanes: mr. speaker, i rise today to commemorate the 192nd anniversary of greek independence day. greece and america are history's most storied democracies. our founding
education, because i feel that if we educate ourselves, the more we educate ourselves, that we can overcome poverty. and the fact that if we do it as a community, and we stick together, we bond together, we support one another, with education, with health, then we can start to fix some of the issues at the root of the cause. and so we can erase, we can erase families who are struggling to get by on minimum wage. we can erase the drug abuse that we see on the streets and in the home. we can erase the gun violence and the domestic violence, and we can start to bring attention to mental illness. but this can only be done if everyone in the community is invested. so i think it has to be a position that we all take in which we say, yeah, take better care of yourself, yeah, go for your prescreening to make sure that you don't have any ailment that can be detrimental to you down the road. we also can then turn to our youth and our adults and say, "it's okay to get educated on these matters, it's okay to do well in school, for the young person that's in school. it's okay to achieve and be academica
guarantee and makes investments in education, innovation and infrastructure necessary to job creation and economic growth and protects the middle class from these large tax increases. the democratic alternative reduces the deficit in a fiscal and responsible way and a balanced way. without causing harm today and without threatening our economic competitiveness for the future and reduces the deficit while meeting our commitment to our seniors, our elderly and to our children. i urge my colleagues to reject the republican budget that threatens our seniors, our middle class and our economic growth and to vote for the democratic alternative that builds on our great strength as a nation. innovative entrepreneurial business sector, skilled rs hard-working middle class, vote for the democratic alternative that will builds on hope, security and opportunity for all americans. the chair: the gentlelady's time has expired. the gentleman from wisconsin. mr. ryan: the gentlelady from pennsylvania said that ending medicare as we know it. i got news for you, obamacare ends medicare as we know it. it
government at home and abroad. >> rand paul wants to accomplish the departments of education and congress and epa. >> small detail. >> and the federal reserve and abolish the income tax. the second amendment which does not allow in his opinion for any form of gun control whatsoever. he makes mitt romney look looks michael due dukakis. >> i paint in primary colors. >> these are details. >> they are details i would just as soon ignore. on some of those fronts. but, again, overall, the primary message that he delivers is less government at home and restraint abroad which you know what? the republican party has been reckless over the past decade. we have paid a lot for it with our philosophy. and so i think he's a good symbol like his father. listen. i voted for his father in the republican primary in 2012. did i agree with what he said about 9/11? >> god, i hope not. >> absolutely not. there are a lot of things that rand paul said i think are way out there and i disagree with, but the core issue of small government at home and restrained foreign policy abroad, i will -- >> not a realistic se
an expansion of engineering and science education, talks about reducing the deficit by eliminate willing waste. how concerned should the gop be about mark sanford's ability to win in the palmetto state now? >> i think they should be very concerned. she is a very impressive candidate in her own right. take away who her brother might or might nop not be or is. take away the baggage that mark sanford has, she is an impressive candidate on her own. an important point to make. that being said, it is likely that sanford will have challenges with women voters in a general election. newt gingrich won the primary. >> what are you trying to imply about our state? >> any time we predict what voters can do they go and do the exact opposite. >> especially in south carolina. >> exactly. no question. my point is even with all the things we are talking about, a tough race for sanford, she is such a strong candidate answered does have real baggage to deal w >> katon, you were quoted in politico, it looks to me like governor sanford has a tough hill to climb, not getting 40% have to convince people who didn't v
to urge them to tell the public -- our job is to educate. it's the public's job to decide when they look on the grocery shelf or have the lever on a soda machine which thing to take, which product is in their interest. all we're trying to do is educate and then hopefully if they understand they would be better off with one product or another, they'll make the intelligent choice. >> you could do ads for education as the executive of new york city, you are telling people what they can and cannot do. why is that government's job to do that? >> we're not telling them at all. we're telling them what science says is or isn't in their interest. we allow you to smoke. we just don't let you smoke where other people have to breathe the smoke that you -- that you're exhaling or comes from your cigarette. the same thing with obesity which incidentally is a public interest because we're going to spend $5 billion on treating people of 0 obesity in our hospitals in new york city alone this year. but regardless -- >> where is the line? where is it too far for government to go? >> i do not think we shoul
're given opportunities to fully participate and take advantage of higher education opportunities and that's what the issue is here. this is distinct from fisher vs. the university of texas. >> neil: the argument could be in michigan they said we addressed this grieve vances in inequalities and it's not an issue anymore. >> that's exactly right sandra day o'connor, the last case that was herd, she said in 25 years this may not be necessary, but in the states that have passed these laws, michigan being one of eight -- have decided it's not necessary anymore. the laws giving previous rep shall treatment based on race, ethnicity is not necessary. >> is that the state usurping the federal government? >> that's the argue. >> in california the appeals court has upheld this, which is another reason why the supreme court is going to hear it. you have two pel las courts with different decisions. >> you look at the history. seems as if this is -- was an inorganic movement. you had one of the architects, a big supporter of the california proposition that heather is referring to, who came on out and s
is education; right? education of using the card in an appropriate fashion. why is that also a key -- a key promise of what you are doing? >> well, we're at an innovation conference, so many innovations and payments in the marketplace. what's challenging is getting consumers to understand the featur and benefits getting them to ado them. that's what pay perks is hre for, educate consumers about what products and features are available for them and get them to use them in ways that benefit, again, the value chain. shibani: dozens of companies here, but few run by a female. talk to me about being a woman in this environment, in thi lean in time hat cheryl sandberg talked about, and, you know, just overall what your views are. >> it's not something i think about a lot. with sheryl out now, it is interesting to think about. i think that there's no difference between male and female ceos, and i think it's nice to get attention from a female ceo, but i would rather be recognized as a ceo. shibani: it was on this day in business back in 1894 that the very first stanl cup championship took place. t
was offered social housing and now determined to improve the situation from the education. he will lose fourteen pounds in the tax and three pounds in council tax leaving 11 pounds per week after utility. based on the prime minister's experience of hardship what advice does he have for jordan? >> the point i would make to the honorable lady, first of all, the government is investing in social housing. she'll hear more about that in a moment or two. the second point, when housing benefit costs 23 billion pounds a year, we have to reform it. there's a basic issue of fairness which is why should someone who is living in private rented accommodation not receive a spare room subsidize when someone in social housing should? there's a basic issue of fairness. that's why it should be put right. >> i might be honorable member for -- i'm very proud of our coalition for sticking to -- [inaudible] >> the honorable lay by's question -- lady's question must be heard. >> we set an example for the world and later on this month the prime minister goes to bali to co-chair the high level panel to discuss
and is now studying for a levels. he is determined to improve his situation through education. from his 56 pound weekly benefits you will lose 14 pounds in the bedroom tax and three pounds in council tax. leaving just 11 pounds per week to live on after utilities. based on the prime minister's experience of hardship, what is does he have? >> the point i would make to the honorable lady is that first this government is investing in social housing and she will hear more about that in a moment or two. the second point i would make is that when housing benefit cost 23 billion pounds a year we simply have to reform it. ofre is a basic issue fairness, which is, why should somebody who is living in private rented accommodation not receive a fair room subsidy when somebody who is in social housing showed? there is a basic issue of fairness. that is why it should be put right. >> unlike the honorable member paul shipley, i am very proud of our coalition for sticking to the 0.7% target. [shouting] >> the honorable ladies question must be heard. people should not year before they ar heard. >> later o
and i sent them to the uk for the quality of education there for a better future and maybe the chance to work. how is this criminal? to have dreams for my children and family and working hard every day. >> now in the meantime, the banks are still closed and there are reports that the two sick banks which should have been able to re-open tomorrow because the emp cb said they would provide liquidity says that they may not open until at least thursday. that would be 12 days with the major banks closed. people are going to the super markets. there may be a food shortage. why was this woman buying so much? she was from russia and she has seen this movie before and she fears shortages. >> you're originally from russia? >> yes, exactly. i have lived through this. uncertainties and yes, i'm worried. >> is that why you think you're doing this today? because you have seen this before? >> yes. i have seen how it develops and how quickly and badly it can develop. >> so the president of this country is supposed to appear any moment. he's usually late and might be worse because there is a meeting t
. >> solman: a blogger for the chronicle of higher education, potter has argued that older scholars are clogging the pipeline for the younger ones. the number of ph.d's now far outstrips the number of tenured job openings. >> there's a lot of rage out there about being trained for jobs that you can never have. is it worth keeping younger people out, not giving them the chance to have full-time work, to develop themselves, so that older people can hang on to keep everything we love? >> solman: and these days, even younger people aren't always spring chickens. it's been seven years since 38- year-old joe fruscione earned his ph.d in english from george washington university. he has yet to land a full-time job. >> the market for ph.d's in humanities is almost super- saturated. there have been some positions where i've had to compete with hundreds of applicants who all on paper have roughly the same education and skill sets. >> so fruscione works three part-time gigs. one is running a moby dick discussion group at a washington, d.c. bookstore. >> when you hear moby dick, you think... >>
was a very educational show. we found out phish is starting a new album tomorrow. that's breaking news. and i got to look at my friend james bennett without a beard and i've got to say -- >> no, don't. >> he looks younger. he looks younger. don't you think? >> it's usually what he says. >> he looks younger. >> so i was asking you what made adam so great, editor of "new york" magazine. >> my boss, my friend and i think arguably the greatest magazine maker of this moment, of the last decade or so. >> he knows how to give a magazine a voice. very important. >> and visually. >> we had a lot of "new york" magazine people on today. >> and what a great cover story. >> knocking it out of the park. >> if it's way too early, what time is it, mike? >> well, it's time for "morning joe." but right now it's time for our ole pal crystal izz acht. >> i need a fix. ♪ i'm going down." >>> president obama's middle east tour treks on just hours after militants fire rockets out of gaza. >>> big moves back in washington as paul ryan's budget gets said for a vote in the house and vice president joe biden says the
education, we need to make sure we protect medicare and what we've seen and the alternative is they don't do that. that create as voucher program for medicare. >> we certainly agree on the opposition to a recession. senator corker, you going to vote for this budget? >> no, i'm not. i don't expect you think i would. it really doesn't address any of the major issues that we need to be dealing with. there's no entitlement reform. republicans would like to see a 75 year fix for our entitlements so that we'll see, know those will be here down the road. if you want to know the truth, larry, neither budget does the things that need to be done for our country but i will say two nights ago we passed a cr, first time since i've been in the united states senate in six years and to months. i was able to vote for a bill that cut real spending. we'll go through this budget process and the democratic budget obviously as you just mentioned doesn't do what it needs to do. republican budget could do more, maybe there's a remote chance that we have a conference that actually addresses the big issues of the da
? we've solved a problem in our society, how to educate the next generation. and let me tell you, this is an important matter. we economists believe that the single most important factor shaping the future of any economy in the world including the united states is the quality and the quantity of the educated trained labor force it produces. college and universities are where we do that. if we're crippling an entire generation with debts they cannot support and jobs that will not encourage them to continue in their studies we are as a nation shooting ourselves in the foot going forward. it's a demonstration of the dysfunctionality of our system. and then the question comes could we forgive the students' debts? well, it's an interesting idea. but how then do you go to the people who can't afford their credit card debts or their home debts or their mortgage debts -- they're all hurting. and the students have a special claim, i give them that. and we need those students, i understand it. but we have to go at the root of a society which allows unspeakable wealth to accumulate in the h
' attitudes about same-sex marriage. >> i think will & grace probably did more to educate the american public than anything anybody's done so far. >> on this, supporters and opponents of same-sex marriage agree, hollywood has been influential of encouraging acceptance of gays and lesbians. it was through the medium of television that millions of americans first had open gays and lesbians in their living rooms. >> i can accept the fact that he's gay, but why does he have to slip a ring on this guy's finger? it was even fodder for the "golden girls". >> everyone wants someone to grow old with. shouldn't everyone have that chance? >> i'm judd. >> in 1994, pedro on the real world san francisco introduced a gay man with hiv/aids to millions of then-teenagers. he died that year and was praised by president clinton. ♪ so no one told you life was gonna be this way ♪ >> it helped to create an environment of acceptance where more and more gays and lesbians came out of the closet. the six friends may have all been straight, but more and more americans have friends that are not. and that's what's cha
education. adcasting, dedicated to strengthening america's future and contributions to your pbs station, from viewers like you. the neighborhood ♪ and contributions to your pbs station, ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbor ♪ ♪ would you be mine? could you be mine? ♪ ♪ won't you be my neighbor? - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ the land of make-believe ♪ won't you ride along with me? - ride along ♪ - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ so much to do, so much to see ♪ ♪ won't you ride along with me? - ride along ♪ - ♪ i've got lots of friends for you to meet ♪ ♪ in the land of make-believe ♪ a friendly face on every street waiting to greet you ♪ ♪ it's a beautiful day in the neighborhood ♪ ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbor ♪ ♪ in daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ - presenting... daniel tiger! ta-dah! ha! ha! ha! today at school, we're putting on a show. and i'm going to sing! ♪ la la la la la la laaaa come see! - ok, everyone, we're ready to start our show! everyone, get ready to show something special you can do. - i'm going to s
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 186 (some duplicates have been removed)